Discussion:
Top Ten Beer Myths
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tomkanpa
2009-05-19 13:28:04 UTC
Permalink
Top 10 Beer Myths

It seems like there is always that guy in the bar that has a
crazy story about the beer he's drinking. The worst part, sometimes
its believable, so you tell someone, then they tell someone, and thats
a beer myth. Here are ten of the more outrageous myths about beer and
what you need to know to set that guy in the bar straight.



Beer Myth 1: Beat the Beer Belly with Light Beer
OK, light beers have maybe 90-100 calories, regular beers
generally have less than 200 calories. A beer lover would say the
difference is comparable to the difference between McDonalds and a 5
star restaurant. A dietician would tell you the difference is
negligible. So unless you are drinking 300 beers a week, I would drink
the good stuff.


Beer Myth 2: The darker the beer, the more alcohol it contains
Not even close. Guinness is black, and has 4.2% alcohol. The
color of a beer comes from the toasted malts, which has no effect on
alcohol content. Ingredients like rice syrup, honey, and corn syrup
add alcohol to beer, but do not influence the color.


Beer Myth 3: Beer is ruined if warmed and then refrigerated
This can be true, if you do it many, many times, and it will
happen gradually. People think re-chilling beer will cause it to be
"skunked". Beer can be ruined by air, light and time. Temperature
won't ruin a beer unless it's extreme. Get fresh beer and store it in
dark place, and it will be fine.


Beer Myth 4: Imported beers have more alcohol than domestic beers
This comes from the way US beers reported their beers' alcohol
content. The rest of the world uses "Alcohol by Volume", here is the
US they used "Alcohol By Weight". Since beer weighs less than water,
US beers had smaller numbers, but not less alcohol.


Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.


Beer Myth 6: Beer shouldn't be Bitter
The bitterness of a beer comes from the hops. Hops are in all
beers to balance the sweet malts and to act as a preservative. Some
beers have a lot of hops, like India Pale Ales (IPAs) and some beers
have less hops, like Wheat Beers. Hops can give a beer complexity and
add all sorts of flavors and aromas, like pine, citrus, and
earthiness. Hops are why people say beer is an acquired taste, but
they also make beer delicious.


Beer Myth 7: The best beers are in green bottles.
As it turns out, brown bottles protect the beer from the light
much better than green bottles or clear bottles. This myth comes from
when there was a shortage of brown glass in Europe after WWII. The
European beers were bottled in green instead, so green bottles came to
represent imports. This certainly isn't the case anymore.


Beer Myth 8: The Thai beer Singha has formaldehyde in it
It seems widely believed that Singha is brewed with
formaldehyde, as is Chang beer, San Miguel, Vietnamese 33, and
Singapore's Tiger Beer. The most believable explanation for this one
is that Singha is much more bitter and contains more alcohol than most
lagers. When American or British expatriots and soldiers were drinking
beer in Thailand, they got drunk much more quickly then they were used
to, and it was much more bitter flavor then they were used to. To
explain this it was suggested that it contained formaldehyde. Crazy.


Beer Myth 9: Corona is Mexican Piss
In the 1980s there was a rumor that Mexican workers were
peeing in the Corona tanks that were destined for the US. Certainly
alarmingly disgusting... if true. As it turns out this myth was
started as a result of Corona's rising popularity in the US market,
and who was jealous? Heineken. This was nothing more than a rumor
started by a Heineken wholesaler in Reno. It all worked out, the guy
from Heineken admitted his wrongdoing, and Corona continued it's rise
to popularity. But the rumor can still be heard today in bars across
the country.


Beer Myth 10: Women don't like beer
Thats crazy! My wife loves beer almost as much as I do. Women
have brewed more beer than men in the History of Beer. Sister Doris in
Bavaria brews Mallersdorf lager. Fortunately, this myth is far from
true.


References:
Michael Jackson's "Why Beer is Best"
Debunking the Beer Myths
Beer Myth article from City Weekly
Lew Bryson's Take on Beer Myths
GregS
2009-05-19 15:04:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by tomkanpa
Top 10 Beer Myths
It seems like there is always that guy in the bar that has a
crazy story about the beer he's drinking. The worst part, sometimes
its believable, so you tell someone, then they tell someone, and thats
a beer myth. Here are ten of the more outrageous myths about beer and
what you need to know to set that guy in the bar straight.
Beer Myth 1: Beat the Beer Belly with Light Beer
OK, light beers have maybe 90-100 calories, regular beers
generally have less than 200 calories. A beer lover would say the
difference is comparable to the difference between McDonalds and a 5
star restaurant. A dietician would tell you the difference is
negligible. So unless you are drinking 300 beers a week, I would drink
the good stuff.
So the only independant beer test I know shows Bud as 4.82 % alcohol and 40 calories
and Bud Light as 3.52 % and 30 calories.
Light is drinkable because you don't get drunk.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 2: The darker the beer, the more alcohol it contains
Not even close. Guinness is black, and has 4.2% alcohol. The
color of a beer comes from the toasted malts, which has no effect on
alcohol content. Ingredients like rice syrup, honey, and corn syrup
add alcohol to beer, but do not influence the color.
I like dark beer and it usually tastes a little more.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 3: Beer is ruined if warmed and then refrigerated
This can be true, if you do it many, many times, and it will
happen gradually. People think re-chilling beer will cause it to be
"skunked". Beer can be ruined by air, light and time. Temperature
won't ruin a beer unless it's extreme. Get fresh beer and store it in
dark place, and it will be fine.
Beer Myth 4: Imported beers have more alcohol than domestic beers
This comes from the way US beers reported their beers' alcohol
content. The rest of the world uses "Alcohol by Volume", here is the
US they used "Alcohol By Weight". Since beer weighs less than water,
US beers had smaller numbers, but not less alcohol.
Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.
Beer Myth 6: Beer shouldn't be Bitter
The bitterness of a beer comes from the hops. Hops are in all
beers to balance the sweet malts and to act as a preservative. Some
beers have a lot of hops, like India Pale Ales (IPAs) and some beers
have less hops, like Wheat Beers. Hops can give a beer complexity and
add all sorts of flavors and aromas, like pine, citrus, and
earthiness. Hops are why people say beer is an acquired taste, but
they also make beer delicious.
My bro likes Keystone.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 7: The best beers are in green bottles.
As it turns out, brown bottles protect the beer from the light
much better than green bottles or clear bottles. This myth comes from
when there was a shortage of brown glass in Europe after WWII. The
European beers were bottled in green instead, so green bottles came to
represent imports. This certainly isn't the case anymore.
How about Corona. Now any glass will filter some UV regardless
of extra tint.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 8: The Thai beer Singha has formaldehyde in it
It seems widely believed that Singha is brewed with
formaldehyde, as is Chang beer, San Miguel, Vietnamese 33, and
Singapore's Tiger Beer. The most believable explanation for this one
is that Singha is much more bitter and contains more alcohol than most
lagers. When American or British expatriots and soldiers were drinking
beer in Thailand, they got drunk much more quickly then they were used
to, and it was much more bitter flavor then they were used to. To
explain this it was suggested that it contained formaldehyde. Crazy.
Beer Myth 9: Corona is Mexican Piss
In the 1980s there was a rumor that Mexican workers were
peeing in the Corona tanks that were destined for the US. Certainly
alarmingly disgusting... if true. As it turns out this myth was
started as a result of Corona's rising popularity in the US market,
and who was jealous? Heineken. This was nothing more than a rumor
started by a Heineken wholesaler in Reno. It all worked out, the guy
from Heineken admitted his wrongdoing, and Corona continued it's rise
to popularity. But the rumor can still be heard today in bars across
the country.
I liked Carta Blanca
Never liker Tecate with the green lime in the top of the can.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 10: Women don't like beer
Thats crazy! My wife loves beer almost as much as I do. Women
have brewed more beer than men in the History of Beer. Sister Doris in
Bavaria brews Mallersdorf lager. Fortunately, this myth is far from
true.
Michael Jackson's "Why Beer is Best"
Debunking the Beer Myths
Beer Myth article from City Weekly
Lew Bryson's Take on Beer Myths
all of dgs
2009-05-19 16:49:05 UTC
Permalink
On 5/19/2009 8:04 AM GregS ignored two million years of human evolution
Post by GregS
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 1: Beat the Beer Belly with Light Beer
OK, light beers have maybe 90-100 calories, regular beers
generally have less than 200 calories.
So the only independant beer test I know shows Bud as 4.82 % alcohol and 40 calories
and Bud Light as 3.52 % and 30 calories.
What is the unit volume? Is it a so-called "standard serving" set at
six ounces, or a full twelve-ounce can? And are those percentages by
weight, or by volume? What is this "independant (sic)" beer test
and where can others read it?
Post by GregS
Light is drinkable because you don't get drunk.
So the people I've seen smashed out of their gourds after guzzling
two cases of "light" beer weren't drunk. Got it.
Post by GregS
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 2: The darker the beer, the more alcohol it contains
Not even close. Guinness is black, and has 4.2% alcohol. The
color of a beer comes from the toasted malts, which has no effect on
alcohol content. Ingredients like rice syrup, honey, and corn syrup
add alcohol to beer, but do not influence the color.
I like dark beer and it usually tastes a little more.
Tastes a little more ... what? bitter? roasty? malty? It's not
hard to find a "pale" beer that has a *lot* more flavor than, say,
an Irish dry stout. Stop in at a Payottenland cafe and ask for an
"oude lambic" some time. Try anything from Cantillon or 3 Fonteinen.
Post by GregS
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 6: Beer shouldn't be Bitter
The bitterness of a beer comes from the hops. Hops are in all
beers to balance the sweet malts and to act as a preservative.
My bro likes Keystone.
So? Keystone is a product made for people who don't like the taste of
beer.
Post by GregS
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 7: The best beers are in green bottles.
As it turns out, brown bottles protect the beer from the light
much better than green bottles or clear bottles. This myth comes from
when there was a shortage of brown glass in Europe after WWII. The
European beers were bottled in green instead, so green bottles came to
represent imports. This certainly isn't the case anymore.
How about Corona. Now any glass will filter some UV regardless
of extra tint.
What matters is the degree of UV attenuation. Clear glass has very
little attenuation, so beer packaged in clear glass bottles will be
most likely to get afflicted by the reaction of UV with iso-alpha-acids,
forming 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Green glass is also insufficiently
attenuative in UV bands. Brown glass is more attenuative, but the
best protection against light-struck beer is an opaque package, like
a keg or a can.
Post by GregS
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 9: Corona is Mexican Piss
[...]
I liked Carta Blanca
Never liker Tecate with the green lime in the top of the can.
Best served as base beers in micheladas.
GregS
2009-05-19 17:44:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by all of dgs
On 5/19/2009 8:04 AM GregS ignored two million years of human evolution
In article
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 1: Beat the Beer Belly with Light Beer
OK, light beers have maybe 90-100 calories, regular beers
generally have less than 200 calories.
So the only independant beer test I know shows Bud as 4.82 % alcohol and 40
calories
and Bud Light as 3.52 % and 30 calories.
What is the unit volume? Is it a so-called "standard serving" set at
six ounces, or a full twelve-ounce can? And are those percentages by
weight, or by volume? What is this "independant (sic)" beer test
and where can others read it?
Its been on the internet longer than I have. Show me a newer test
and I'll refer it.

http://www.fichenet.com/Images/FNSampleNormal.pdf
Post by all of dgs
Light is drinkable because you don't get drunk.
So the people I've seen smashed out of their gourds after guzzling
two cases of "light" beer weren't drunk. Got it.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 2: The darker the beer, the more alcohol it contains
Not even close. Guinness is black, and has 4.2% alcohol. The
color of a beer comes from the toasted malts, which has no effect on
alcohol content. Ingredients like rice syrup, honey, and corn syrup
add alcohol to beer, but do not influence the color.
I like dark beer and it usually tastes a little more.
Tastes a little more ... what? bitter? roasty? malty? It's not
hard to find a "pale" beer that has a *lot* more flavor than, say,
an Irish dry stout. Stop in at a Payottenland cafe and ask for an
"oude lambic" some time. Try anything from Cantillon or 3 Fonteinen.
A little more flavor, instead of more of a soda water taste like light beer.
Post by all of dgs
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 6: Beer shouldn't be Bitter
The bitterness of a beer comes from the hops. Hops are in all
beers to balance the sweet malts and to act as a preservative.
My bro likes Keystone.
So? Keystone is a product made for people who don't like the taste of
beer.
Perhaps.
Post by all of dgs
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 7: The best beers are in green bottles.
As it turns out, brown bottles protect the beer from the light
much better than green bottles or clear bottles. This myth comes from
when there was a shortage of brown glass in Europe after WWII. The
European beers were bottled in green instead, so green bottles came to
represent imports. This certainly isn't the case anymore.
How about Corona. Now any glass will filter some UV regardless
of extra tint.
What matters is the degree of UV attenuation. Clear glass has very
little attenuation, so beer packaged in clear glass bottles will be
most likely to get afflicted by the reaction of UV with iso-alpha-acids,
forming 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Green glass is also insufficiently
attenuative in UV bands. Brown glass is more attenuative, but the
best protection against light-struck beer is an opaque package, like
a keg or a can.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 9: Corona is Mexican Piss
[...]
I liked Carta Blanca
Never liker Tecate with the green lime in the top of the can.
Best served as base beers in micheladas.
GregS
2009-05-19 17:51:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by GregS
Post by all of dgs
On 5/19/2009 8:04 AM GregS ignored two million years of human evolution
In article
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 1: Beat the Beer Belly with Light Beer
OK, light beers have maybe 90-100 calories, regular beers
generally have less than 200 calories.
So the only independant beer test I know shows Bud as 4.82 % alcohol and 40
calories
and Bud Light as 3.52 % and 30 calories.
What is the unit volume? Is it a so-called "standard serving" set at
six ounces, or a full twelve-ounce can? And are those percentages by
weight, or by volume? What is this "independant (sic)" beer test
and where can others read it?
Its been on the internet longer than I have. Show me a newer test
and I'll refer it.
http://www.fichenet.com/Images/FNSampleNormal.pdf
I realize all this will vary from time to time, but I have no respect for
the manufacturers data. They were trying to get companies to publish
contents on the labels a long time ago when I was a member of
Beer Drinkers of America.

I was also complaining 10 years ago that a NEW test be made.

greg
Joel
2009-05-19 15:09:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by tomkanpa
Top 10 Beer Myths
Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.
Most (all?) bottled and canned Guinness sold in the US
these days is made in Canada. I don't think it tastes the
same (or as good, but that's a personal taste issue) as the
kegged Guinness that's brewed in Ireland.
So this one is not really a myth.
Post by tomkanpa
Beer Myth 8: The Thai beer Singha has formaldehyde in it
It seems widely believed that Singha is brewed with
formaldehyde, as is Chang beer, San Miguel, Vietnamese 33, and
Singapore's Tiger Beer. The most believable explanation for this one
is that Singha is much more bitter and contains more alcohol than most
lagers. When American or British expatriots and soldiers were drinking
beer in Thailand, they got drunk much more quickly then they were used
to, and it was much more bitter flavor then they were used to. To
explain this it was suggested that it contained formaldehyde. Crazy.
Perhaps Singha did/does not contain formaldehyde, but
there is a good reason for this "myth":

http://www.beer-faq.com/beer-basics/formaldehyde-beer/

IOW some Asian beer does (or did) contain formaldehyde.
--
Joel Plutchak

"New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any
other reason but because they are not already common." - John Locke
V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
2009-05-19 16:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel
Post by tomkanpa
Top 10 Beer Myths
Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.
Most (all?) bottled and canned Guinness sold in the US
these days is made in Canada. I don't think it tastes the
same (or as good, but that's a personal taste issue) as the
kegged Guinness that's brewed in Ireland.
So this one is not really a myth.
Does that include the 50 Litre can I'm pumping in my basement?

Since the source of this was from Michael Jackson, I'll assume
your contribution is flawed.
--
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"Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
Joel
2009-05-19 16:45:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
Post by Joel
Post by tomkanpa
Top 10 Beer Myths
Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.
Most (all?) bottled and canned Guinness sold in the US
these days is made in Canada. I don't think it tastes the
same (or as good, but that's a personal taste issue) as the
kegged Guinness that's brewed in Ireland.
So this one is not really a myth.
Does that include the 50 Litre can I'm pumping in my basement?
Since the source of this was from Michael Jackson, I'll assume
your contribution is flawed.
All you have to do is look on the cans. It's there.
And Michael Jackson is not. At some point while he was
still alive, it was true that all Guinness sold in the
US was brewed in Ireland, so what he may have written at
one time would have been valid at that time. That has
changed.
But believe what you like. <shrug>
--
Joel Plutchak

"New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any
other reason but because they are not already common." - John Locke
V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
2009-05-19 21:30:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel
Post by V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
Post by Joel
Post by tomkanpa
Top 10 Beer Myths
Beer Myth 5: The Guinness they serve in Ireland is better
It seems widely accepted that beer in "the old country" is
better than what they export to the rest of the world. The brewing
process is cheap, so why would a brewery risk their reputation by
brewing a different beer for export? It doesn't make sense, and it's
not true. With few exceptions, the beer that is exported is the exact
same beer that they serve in the bar across the street from the
brewery. The difference is purely freshness. It takes two weeks for a
keg of Guinness to get from Dublin to your favorite bar in the states.
Some beers, like Fosters, is brewed in Canada under a license for sale
in the US. But it is clearly stated on the bottle when this is the
case.
Most (all?) bottled and canned Guinness sold in the US
these days is made in Canada. I don't think it tastes the
same (or as good, but that's a personal taste issue) as the
kegged Guinness that's brewed in Ireland.
So this one is not really a myth.
Does that include the 50 Litre can I'm pumping in my basement?
Since the source of this was from Michael Jackson, I'll assume
your contribution is flawed.
All you have to do is look on the cans. It's there.
And Michael Jackson is not. At some point while he was
still alive, it was true that all Guinness sold in the
US was brewed in Ireland, so what he may have written at
one time would have been valid at that time. That has
changed.
The can says (well, the label around the neck, anyway):

GUINNESS
Arthur Guinness (script signature)

BEER, PRODUCT OF IRELAND
Brewed in Ireland by Guinness & Co. St. James's Gate, Dublin 8, Ireland.
The GUINNESS Word, Harp Device and ARTHUR GUINNESS Signature are trade marks

CONTENTS: 13.2 US GALLONS
IMPORTED BY DIAGEO -- GUINNESS U.S.A., NORWALK, CT.

Contains Barley

WARNING * ATTENTION
THIS KEG WILL RUPTURE AND MAY CAUSE
INJURY IF OVER-PRESSURIZED WITH COMPRESSED
AIR OR CO2. TAPPING SYSTEM AND PRESSURE
REGULATOR SHOULD BE EQUIPPED WITH A PRESSURE
BLOWOFF DEVICE. IF YOU ARE NOT FAMILIAR WITH TAPPING
EQUIPMENT, CONSULT YOUR RETAILER OR THE LOCAL BEER DISTRIBUTOR.

GROSS WT -- 137LB (62.2Kgs) NET WT -- 111LB (50.3Kgs) TARE WT -- 26LB (11.9Kgs)
Post by Joel
But believe what you like. <shrug>
--
Joel Plutchak
Damn false advertising. Do you think I have a legal case since this says it's
BREWED IN IRELAND but you know it's BREWED IN CANADA?
--
VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)ORG

http://www.quirkfactory.com/popart/asskey/eqn2.png

"Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
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