Discussion:
Beer formula recently discovered from 1825 Archives
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john east
2012-02-04 18:42:24 UTC
Permalink
Formula for beer from the year1825 has just been discovered in archives.



http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*** A recipe for beer made with treacle has been discovered – but no one
knows just how strong it really is.


It was written by ale lover Thomas Denton, who was determined to recreate
his favourite tipple, London Porter.


For 72 pints of stout, you will need a peck of barley, 4oz of hops, 7lb of
treacle and several gallons of boiling water.


Mr Denton, of Goole, east Yorkshire, also recommended letting the potent
brew ferment for seven days.


Sam Bartle, from East Riding’s archive service, said: 'The instructions are
quite simple but anyone wanting to try out the recipe would have to do so at
their own risk.


'Following the recipe would produce a huge amount of beer, 72 pints, and it
actually recommends a nine gallon cask for brewing.


'For it to be tried in most modern homes it would probably require some
scaling down of the quantities.'



http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p#ixzz1lRIwxcU1***----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 Peck = 9.01 litres or 2 gallons.It looks easy to make and is ready in seven days. To me it seems in-expensive to make, since treacle could be purchased inbulk. Novice grateful for any tips on trying to make this one. Thanks
Tom Biasi
2012-02-04 21:05:01 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 18:42:24 -0000, "john east"
Post by john east
Formula for beer from the year1825 has just been discovered in archives.
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*** A recipe for beer made with treacle has been discovered – but no one
knows just how strong it really is.
It was written by ale lover Thomas Denton, who was determined to recreate
his favourite tipple, London Porter.
For 72 pints of stout, you will need a peck of barley, 4oz of hops, 7lb of
treacle and several gallons of boiling water.
Mr Denton, of Goole, east Yorkshire, also recommended letting the potent
brew ferment for seven days.
Sam Bartle, from East Riding’s archive service, said: 'The instructions are
quite simple but anyone wanting to try out the recipe would have to do so at
their own risk.
'Following the recipe would produce a huge amount of beer, 72 pints, and it
actually recommends a nine gallon cask for brewing.
'For it to be tried in most modern homes it would probably require some
scaling down of the quantities.'
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p#ixzz1lRIwxcU1***----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 Peck = 9.01 litres or 2 gallons.It looks easy to make and is ready in seven days. To me it seems in-expensive to make, since treacle could be purchased inbulk. Novice grateful for any tips on trying to make this one. Thanks
Doesn't sound very good, and only 4 Oz. of hops?

Tom
Steve B
2012-02-05 00:36:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Biasi
On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 18:42:24 -0000, "john east"
Post by john east
Formula for beer from the year1825 has just been discovered in archives.
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*** A recipe for beer made with treacle has been discovered - but no one
knows just how strong it really is.
It was written by ale lover Thomas Denton, who was determined to recreate
his favourite tipple, London Porter.
For 72 pints of stout, you will need a peck of barley, 4oz of hops, 7lb of
treacle and several gallons of boiling water.
Mr Denton, of Goole, east Yorkshire, also recommended letting the potent
brew ferment for seven days.
Sam Bartle, from East Riding's archive service, said: 'The instructions
are
quite simple but anyone wanting to try out the recipe would have to do so at
their own risk.
'Following the recipe would produce a huge amount of beer, 72 pints, and it
actually recommends a nine gallon cask for brewing.
'For it to be tried in most modern homes it would probably require some
scaling down of the quantities.'
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p#ixzz1lRIwxcU1***----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1
Peck = 9.01 litres or 2 gallons.It looks easy to make and is ready in
seven days. To me it seems in-expensive to make, since treacle could be
purchased inbulk. Novice grateful for any tips on trying to make this
one. Thanks
Doesn't sound very good, and only 4 Oz. of hops?
Tom
Awright. Turn in your beer drinking permission slip. Commenting on a beer
you've never tasted is heresy in the beer world.

I'd like to taste it, but only if someone else went to all the work, and I
didn't have to make a 9 gallon taste test.

Beer drinkers have such a fine palate. I used to tend bar. Had a regular
who would come in, and order two beers because if I only brought him one,
he's be finished before I came round again. Nice gun, good tipper. Used to
comment on how good his taster was. After three or four, I slipped him a
glass of something he didn't drink. How's that ****? Great, he said. I
told him that I had switched to a brand he expressly stated he didn't like.

Proved my point.

Steve
Tom Biasi
2012-02-05 01:29:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Beer drinkers have such a fine palate. I used to tend bar. Had a regular
who would come in, and order two beers because if I only brought him one,
he's be finished before I came round again. Nice gun, good tipper. Used to
comment on how good his taster was. After three or four, I slipped him a
glass of something he didn't drink. How's that ****? Great, he said. I
told him that I had switched to a brand he expressly stated he didn't like.
Proved my point.
Steve
Proved your point and lost your tip?
BTW: What kind of gun did he have?

Tom
Steve B
2012-02-05 04:28:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Biasi
Post by Steve B
Beer drinkers have such a fine palate. I used to tend bar. Had a regular
who would come in, and order two beers because if I only brought him one,
he's be finished before I came round again. Nice gun, good tipper. Used to
comment on how good his taster was. After three or four, I slipped him a
glass of something he didn't drink. How's that ****? Great, he said. I
told him that I had switched to a brand he expressly stated he didn't like.
Proved my point.
Steve
Proved your point and lost your tip?
BTW: What kind of gun did he have?
Tom
He took it very well, actually. And I never ever slipped him a substitute
again. Even told him that now that I'd made my point that there was no need
to repeat it. If I saw him hit the door, I'd draw two and have them ready.
That was enough to keep his tipping streak alive. Yeah, that, and when he
was down to 1/4th of a beer, have another ready. And if he said he didn't
want another, I'd just say, well, then don't pay for something you don't
want, and he'd drink it or part, or I'd dump it.

Steve
Diogenes
2012-02-05 01:31:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Post by Tom Biasi
On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 18:42:24 -0000, "john east"
Post by john east
Formula for beer from the year1825 has just been discovered in archives.
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*** A recipe for beer made with treacle has been discovered - but no one
knows just how strong it really is.
It was written by ale lover Thomas Denton, who was determined to recreate
his favourite tipple, London Porter.
For 72 pints of stout, you will need a peck of barley, 4oz of hops, 7lb of
treacle and several gallons of boiling water.
Mr Denton, of Goole, east Yorkshire, also recommended letting the potent
brew ferment for seven days.
Sam Bartle, from East Riding's archive service, said: 'The instructions
are
quite simple but anyone wanting to try out the recipe would have to do so at
their own risk.
'Following the recipe would produce a huge amount of beer, 72 pints, and it
actually recommends a nine gallon cask for brewing.
'For it to be tried in most modern homes it would probably require some
scaling down of the quantities.'
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p#ixzz1lRIwxcU1***----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1
Peck = 9.01 litres or 2 gallons.It looks easy to make and is ready in
seven days. To me it seems in-expensive to make, since treacle could be
purchased inbulk. Novice grateful for any tips on trying to make this
one. Thanks
Doesn't sound very good, and only 4 Oz. of hops?
Tom
Awright. Turn in your beer drinking permission slip. Commenting on a beer
you've never tasted is heresy in the beer world.
I'd like to taste it, but only if someone else went to all the work, and I
didn't have to make a 9 gallon taste test.
Beer drinkers have such a fine palate. I used to tend bar. Had a regular
who would come in, and order two beers because if I only brought him one,
he's be finished before I came round again. Nice gun, good tipper. Used to
comment on how good his taster was. After three or four, I slipped him a
glass of something he didn't drink. How's that ****? Great, he said. I
told him that I had switched to a brand he expressly stated he didn't like.
Proved my point.
Obviously you did, but afterwards was he *still* a good tipper?
----
Diogenes

The wars are long, the peace is frail
The madmen come again . . . .
Steve B
2012-02-05 04:29:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Diogenes
Post by Steve B
Post by Tom Biasi
On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 18:42:24 -0000, "john east"
Post by john east
Formula for beer from the year1825 has just been discovered in archives.
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*** A recipe for beer made with treacle has been discovered - but no one
knows just how strong it really is.
It was written by ale lover Thomas Denton, who was determined to recreate
his favourite tipple, London Porter.
For 72 pints of stout, you will need a peck of barley, 4oz of hops, 7lb of
treacle and several gallons of boiling water.
Mr Denton, of Goole, east Yorkshire, also recommended letting the potent
brew ferment for seven days.
Sam Bartle, from East Riding's archive service, said: 'The instructions
are
quite simple but anyone wanting to try out the recipe would have to do
so
at
their own risk.
'Following the recipe would produce a huge amount of beer, 72 pints, and it
actually recommends a nine gallon cask for brewing.
'For it to be tried in most modern homes it would probably require some
scaling down of the quantities.'
http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/889159-brewing-formula-from-1825-lets-you-make-your-own-beer-for-just-11p#ixzz1lRIwxcU1***----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1
Peck = 9.01 litres or 2 gallons.It looks easy to make and is ready in
seven days. To me it seems in-expensive to make, since treacle could be
purchased inbulk. Novice grateful for any tips on trying to make this
one. Thanks
Doesn't sound very good, and only 4 Oz. of hops?
Tom
Awright. Turn in your beer drinking permission slip. Commenting on a beer
you've never tasted is heresy in the beer world.
I'd like to taste it, but only if someone else went to all the work, and I
didn't have to make a 9 gallon taste test.
Beer drinkers have such a fine palate. I used to tend bar. Had a regular
who would come in, and order two beers because if I only brought him one,
he's be finished before I came round again. Nice gun, good tipper. Used to
comment on how good his taster was. After three or four, I slipped him a
glass of something he didn't drink. How's that ****? Great, he said. I
told him that I had switched to a brand he expressly stated he didn't like.
Proved my point.
Obviously you did, but afterwards was he *still* a good tipper?
Yeah. He took it well.

Steve
David M. Taylor
2012-02-12 05:21:54 UTC
Permalink
The above recipe is intriguing to me. It appears to be not a very
wimpy beer, but fairly strong, and could be classified similar to a
Baltic-style porter. Here's my best guess of how I would tackle it:

5 gallon recipe
OG~1.070
ABV~7%
IBU~34
SRM~29

7.25 lb British mild ale malt
3.5 lb British treacle
2 oz Kent Goldings (leaf hops, 5.5% alpha, 60 minutes)
Wyeast 1313 London ale yeast

Make a reasonably big starter a couple days in advance. Mash the malt
alone at 158 F for 1 hour -- thick mash of about 0.9 qts/lb. Infuse
with boiling water and sparge as normal. Bring to boil, add treacle
and hops, and boil for an hour as normal. Chill to 64 F and pitch
yeast. Ferment 7 days at 64 F. Secondary if desired. Prime and
bottle or keg as normal.

I might have to try this recipe one day. It will require some bravery
as the character of treacle/molasses can be pretty severe. But it
should be interesting to try, once anyway. If anyone out there wants
to try it, let me know how it turns out!

--
David M. Taylor
"Just a drink, a little drink, and I'll be feeling GOOooOOooOOooD!!"
-- Genesis, 1972-ish
Scott
2012-02-12 12:47:48 UTC
Permalink
Sounds like a lot of treacle to me for 5 gallons...let me know how it
turns out...

Ace
Post by David M. Taylor
The above recipe is intriguing to me. It appears to be not a very
wimpy beer, but fairly strong, and could be classified similar to a
5 gallon recipe
OG~1.070
ABV~7%
IBU~34
SRM~29
7.25 lb British mild ale malt
3.5 lb British treacle
2 oz Kent Goldings (leaf hops, 5.5% alpha, 60 minutes)
Wyeast 1313 London ale yeast
Steve Bonine
2012-02-12 15:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by David M. Taylor
The above recipe is intriguing to me. It appears to be not a very
wimpy beer, but fairly strong, and could be classified similar to a
5 gallon recipe
OG~1.070
ABV~7%
IBU~34
SRM~29
7.25 lb British mild ale malt
3.5 lb British treacle
2 oz Kent Goldings (leaf hops, 5.5% alpha, 60 minutes)
Wyeast 1313 London ale yeast
Make a reasonably big starter a couple days in advance. Mash the malt
alone at 158 F for 1 hour -- thick mash of about 0.9 qts/lb. Infuse
with boiling water and sparge as normal. Bring to boil, add treacle
and hops, and boil for an hour as normal. Chill to 64 F and pitch
yeast. Ferment 7 days at 64 F. Secondary if desired. Prime and
bottle or keg as normal.
Too much treacle in it for me. That doesn't make it wrong, just not my
personal taste. I've brewed with treacle, and a little goes a long way
in my opinion.

Oddly enough, I could not find a listing for Wyeast 1313. 1028 is
"London Ale". Typo, or just a variant?
Bart Goddard
2012-02-12 20:08:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Bonine
Too much treacle in it for me. That doesn't make it wrong, just not my
personal taste. I've brewed with treacle, and a little goes a long way
in my opinion.
There's treacle and then there's treacle. Dark treacle has that
distinctive, strong molasses taste (which I can't stand), but
the golden treacle doesn't. I don't know what sort "British
treacle" is, but if it's the lighter variety, 3 lbs may not
overwhelm your palate so much.
--
Cheerfully resisting change since 1959.
Tom Biasi
2012-02-12 20:40:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Goddard
Post by Steve Bonine
Too much treacle in it for me. That doesn't make it wrong, just not my
personal taste. I've brewed with treacle, and a little goes a long way
in my opinion.
There's treacle and then there's treacle. Dark treacle has that
distinctive, strong molasses taste (which I can't stand), but
the golden treacle doesn't. I don't know what sort "British
treacle" is, but if it's the lighter variety, 3 lbs may not
overwhelm your palate so much.
Do you think there is enough hops for that much sweetness?

Tom
Bart Goddard
2012-02-12 20:46:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Biasi
Do you think there is enough hops for that much sweetness?
Not for me. But if the treacle is very light, perhaps it
ferments out fairly dry...?
--
Cheerfully resisting change since 1959.
David M. Taylor
2012-02-13 03:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Use the light kind of treacle, not the dark stuff. The BU:GU ratio is
about 0.5, so there should be plenty of bitterness. Treacle is 90%
fermentable so it's not going to turn out to be sweet really, which is
also why I specified a thick mash at 158 F to help compensate for what
would otherwise be a very very dry beer.

--
David M. Taylor
"Just a drink, a little drink, and I'll be feeling GOOooOOooOOooD!!"
-- Genesis, 1972-ish
Tom Biasi
2012-02-13 06:20:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Goddard
Post by Tom Biasi
Do you think there is enough hops for that much sweetness?
Not for me. But if the treacle is very light, perhaps it
ferments out fairly dry...?
The peck of barley from back then probably wouldn't.

Tom
Bart Goddard
2012-02-13 12:57:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Biasi
Post by Bart Goddard
Post by Tom Biasi
Do you think there is enough hops for that much sweetness?
Not for me. But if the treacle is very light, perhaps it
ferments out fairly dry...?
The peck of barley from back then probably wouldn't.
You'd just have to use a simple quintuple-decoction mash.
It takes three days, but while you're waiting on the
protein rest, you can churn your butter.
--
Cheerfully resisting change since 1959.
Brian Peterssss
2012-02-14 15:13:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by David M. Taylor
The above recipe is intriguing to me. It appears to be not a very
wimpy beer, but fairly strong, and could be classified similar to a
5 gallon recipe
OG~1.070
ABV~7%
IBU~34
SRM~29
7.25 lb British mild ale malt
3.5 lb British treacle
2 oz Kent Goldings (leaf hops, 5.5% alpha, 60 minutes)
Wyeast 1313 London ale yeast
Speaking of old recipes, has anyone made anything from the "Shut up about
Barclay Perkins" blog? I've recently been plowing through it, and the
idea of making an old style beer sounds cool, but the volume of recipes
is kind of overwhelming

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/

Some of the recipes seem fairly straightforward and not too different
from what you'd see today, but then there are others like these

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2011/11/lets-brew-wednesday-1885-
ushers-pa.html

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2009/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1917-
whitbread-x.html

Does anyone have any recommendations for a good old beer recipe from this
site (or another) which is unlike the typical bitter / mild / pale ale
that would get made today?
Tom Biasi
2012-02-15 02:38:55 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 Feb 2012 15:13:02 +0000 (UTC), Brian Peterssss
Post by Brian Peterssss
Post by David M. Taylor
The above recipe is intriguing to me. It appears to be not a very
wimpy beer, but fairly strong, and could be classified similar to a
5 gallon recipe
OG~1.070
ABV~7%
IBU~34
SRM~29
7.25 lb British mild ale malt
3.5 lb British treacle
2 oz Kent Goldings (leaf hops, 5.5% alpha, 60 minutes)
Wyeast 1313 London ale yeast
Speaking of old recipes, has anyone made anything from the "Shut up about
Barclay Perkins" blog? I've recently been plowing through it, and the
idea of making an old style beer sounds cool, but the volume of recipes
is kind of overwhelming
http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/
Some of the recipes seem fairly straightforward and not too different
from what you'd see today, but then there are others like these
http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2011/11/lets-brew-wednesday-1885-
ushers-pa.html
http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2009/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1917-
whitbread-x.html
Does anyone have any recommendations for a good old beer recipe from this
site (or another) which is unlike the typical bitter / mild / pale ale
that would get made today?
How did you come up with those proportions?

Tom

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